Grade 10 North West learner, Keatlegile Mthimunye, is playing her part to preserve indigenous games and wants to get more people playing Morabaraba. Photos: Supplied
Grade 10 North West learner, Keatlegile Mthimunye, is playing her part to preserve indigenous games and wants to get more people playing Morabaraba. Photos: Supplied

Keatlegile Mthimunye Playing Her Part to Preserve Indigenous Games

by | Sep 24, 2021

Efforts continue around the country to preserve indigenous games. Currently, there is the 15th edition of the National Indigenous Games festival taking place in Durban, involving participants from all nine provinces.

In the North West Province, Grade 10 learner, Keatlegile Mthimunye, from Biesiesvlei in Lichtenburg, is on a mission to play her part.

Mthimunye dreams of one day running an NPO where she can promote her love for Morabaraba.

She started playing Morabaraba when she was six years old and says it quickly grew from a hobby to a real passion.

Research has linked Morabaraba to mathematical problem solving skills because it allows for a simplified lesson on area and perimeter of squares.

Click here to find out How to Play

Mthimunye’s best advice to anyone who starts playing Morabaraba is to practice every day.

This bright young star chats to Tlamelo Kganakga about her love for Morabaraba and how others can get involved in keeping these games alive.

 

Keatlegile, thank you for chatting to us. Please tell us about yourself and where you are from?

My name is Keatlegile  Mthimunye from Biesiesvlei in Lichtenburg and I’m in Grade 10.

 

Where did you start playing Morabaraba and what attracted you to it?

I’ve loved playing Morabaraba since I was 6 years old in primary school. I used to take it as a hobby but my love grew for it. My love and passion towards Morabaraba grew everyday till this day.

 

For someone who doesn’t understand the sport, how would you explain it?

I’d teach that person different tricks on how to go through playing it. Also giving that person the most important advice, which is to practice every chance they get. This is one simple game, one has to relax and be themselves. No need to panic.

 

Looking at indigenous games, why is it important to keep them alive?

Everything has changed now, it’s more like people are throwing away their culture, so if we continue to play I might motivate other teenagers to play this sport. That way our indigenous games will forever be alive. We’re doing this to preserve culture.

 

What has been the highlights of your career in the sport?

For now I’ve got no highlights. I just won a couple of times but I can’t really say that those are highlights. I have hope that I’m yet to have highlights in my career in the sport.

 

Who are some of the sportswomen you admire and why?

Helen Mayer she was an Olympic athlete who did well in her sporting career and Morgan Pressel who is an American professional golfer, currently playing on the LPGA Tour. She’s done well for herself.

 

What advice do you have for someone interested in playing the sport?

They must have no doubts just join and they shall see that this is just one exciting sport which requires only practice.

 

What else do you else do you hope to achieve in your career?

I just want to own an NPO whereby I’ll teach youngsters what I do best, which is playing Morabaraba. There’s a good career within that sport then I’d help them with everything I have to get into that career.

 

What do you think we as media can do to amplify women’s sports coverage?

Media must start focusing more on female who are into sport because I think biasness towards women who are into sport is still making waves. We’re in modern times but females still don’t get equal opportunities in sport like men.

Media focuses more on men than women, this is a fact and for this to come to an end I think media must report more on women involved in sports, to attract other women into playing different sports, and giving them hope that they can also get opportunities just as males.

 

We celebrate Heritage Month with the sport. Tell us about your heritage and what it means to you?

24th of September really means a lot to me, as I get to discover everything about my culture and tradition. Celebrate everything that has to be celebrated about my culture, and showcase my tradition without doubts.

 

Photos caption: Grade 10 North West learner, Keatlegile Mthimunye, is playing her part to preserve indigenous games and wants to get more people playing Morabaraba. Photos: Supplied

 

Share this article:

About the Author:

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Categories

Related Posts